Arizona Fishing Forums on AZBZ banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
talking to my buddys at work they say baseball has more revenue the fishing.
im saying that all of fishing has more revenue.
im saying both games, old to young, pros to sandlot, that fishing has more revenue than does baseball.
what do you say?
any references would help me kick their butts with info or links
thanks guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
This one's going to be tough
Keep in mind that there's a ton of people going out fishing in the ocean every day. The price to get on those boats is expensive. Southern California landings total about 3000 people per day. That's from LA down to the border You could probably run daily cost for those individuals at $100.00 (conservative). That number only includes fishing and food. Throw in the cost of gear per day that number goes up. I would say a daily estimate in Southern California is easily over $300k a day. That's just in the ocean. I hope that helps. Looking at the numbers baseball might be more?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
34,643 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts
Don't see anyone building a stadium for fisherman. I love both but would have to go with baseball. Figure in advertising,tickets,food,souvenirs,what players are paid,sponsership and equipment. Stadium employees groundskeepers ect. Add in transportation all over the country by air. I think the guys you work with have probably got it right. JMHO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,870 Posts
It's not even close, look at what the baseball players make to what the top fisherman makes. The revenue is a hell of alot higher in bball than fishing. Revenue is what someone makes off of a certain thing. I think you mean monies spent on a particular sport.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,117 Posts
It's not even close. The revenue for MLB alone was 6.5 billion in 2008. Now think about all the small town rec leagues, softball and little league across the U.S.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
646 Posts
The following is a summation of the American Sportfishing Association’s newly-released report on the
economic impact of sportfishermen on our economy. The results are irrefutable; anglers are a big engine
in today’s economy.
In A Nutshell: Anglers’ Expenditures Have A Significant Impact on the Nation’s Economy
Recreational fishing is more than just a getaway for millions of Americans. As an industry, it provides a
living for countless people in businesses ranging from fishing tackle and accessories manufacturing to
travel and hospitality to boat manufacturing. According to a new report on fishing statistics, published by
the American Sportfishing Association (ASA), when expenditures are multiplied by America’s nearly 40
million anglers, their dollars have a significant impact on our nation’s economy.
Sportfishing in America: An Economic Engine and Conservation Powerhouse highlights how fishing not
only endures as an activity that permeates social and economic aspects of Americans’ lives, but also
plays a huge role in the country’s successful conservation movement.
“As an industry, we are keenly aware of the impact that sportfishing has on this nation’s economy,” said
ASA President and CEO Mike Nussman. “Just by enjoying a day on the water, men, women and children
across the United States pump billions of dollars into this country’s economy.” Nussman further said, “And
it’s not just the economy; America’s anglers are in many ways the nation’s most powerful force for the
environment investing hundreds of millions of dollars each year in fisheries management and
conservation through taxes on fishing equipment and license sales.”
America’s nearly 40 million anglers spend over $45 billion per year on fishing equipment, transportation,
lodging and other expenses associated with their sport. With a total annual economic impact of $125
billion, fishing supports over one million jobs and generates $34 billion in wages and $16 billion in tax
revenues each year. The average amount anglers spend yearly on hooks, rods, lures and other fishing
tackle increased 16 percent from 2001 to 2006.
A number of reports strongly indicate that fishing is identified by American families as one of the best
ways to spend quality time together. According to the National Sporting Goods Association, fishing as a
leisure-time activity ranks higher than playing basketball or softball, skateboarding, jogging or hiking.
Substantially more than any other groups, anglers support the nation’s conservation efforts through the
Sport Fish Restoration Program. Special taxes on fishing gear and motorboat fuel channel hundreds of
millions of anglers’ dollars to state fish and wildlife conservation and recreation programs each year.
The American Sportfishing Association’s analysis is based on data from the 2006 National Survey of
Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, conducted every five years on behalf of the
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies by the Census Bureau and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Sportfishing in America was produced for ASA by Southwick Associates, Fernandina Beach, Fla.
Additional economic facts about sportfishing:
· The nearly one million jobs supported by anglers are almost three times the number of people who work
for United Parcel Service in the U.S.
· The amount of federal tax revenues generated by angler spending in 2006 - $8.9 billion - is roughly
equal to the entire 2006 budget for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
· In 2006, the top 10 states with residents who fished, based on the percentage of population, are: Alaska,
Wyoming, Montana, Minnesota, Maine, Wisconsin, Idaho, Arkansas, West Virginia and Mississippi.
· In 2006, the top 10 states that attract the highest number of non-resident anglers are: Florida, North
Carolina, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, South Carolina, Maryland, Arkansas, New York and Texas.
· In 2006, the total days of fishing in the U.S. equaled 1,289,300 years of fishing.
· The not-so-lowly catfish is pursued by nearly seven million anglers, more than the population of Arizona,
Massachusetts or Washington.
· All the dollars spent by anglers, attached end to end, would reach to the moon and back – nine times!
The American Sportfishing Association (ASA) is the sportfishing industry’s trade association, committed to
looking out for the interests of the entire sportfishing community. We give the industry a unified voice,
speaking out on behalf of sportfishing and boating industries, state and federal natural resource agencies,
conservation organizations, angler advocacy groups and outdoor journalists when emerging laws and
policies could significantly affect sportfishing business or sportfishing itself. We invest in long-term
ventures to ensure the industry will remain strong and prosperous as well as safeguard and promote the
enduring social, economic and conservation values of sportfishing in America.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Is this really a topic up for discussion? Baseball blows fishing out of the water. Superficially take for example ESPN which I believe owns BASS...they dont even really promote it on the website...its third to last under all sports!!! (to be fair it looks to be grouped with the other outdoor/******* sports). If BASS made more money, then we would see KVD or Ike on the home page, not that ARod used roids and now has even smaller testicles.
I think the second big thing you dont take into account is advertising. Nike shells out HUGE $ to sports teams...Adidas, McAffee, Banks, etc....they all have adds up or own the name to the stadiums....that is big bucks....what does Toyota pay KVD to wrap his boat? Hell, I read Ike's book and he was waiting for someone to throw him a million a year in sponsorship.
And the most telling of all....these guys have to drive everywhere themselves and stay in thier trucks or in dive hotels. Maybe not all of em and maybe not all the time, but many....if this sport was raking in the big $, they would have people to do that bullshit for em or sponsors would just have new boats waiting for them already customized how they like em.
Sure, lures, Rods, sonar etc are expensive and tons are sold (hell, KVD made a movement out of a color pattern) but think of the R&D that gets put into them...that costs $...new metals for rattles, scents, rod materials and layerings, sonar equipment...the basic concept of the mit and the bat really havent changed (execpt for metal bats and catchers equipment).
Finally and most importantly...attendance.....come one man...162 games x 30 teams....tv rights, liscensing for products, baseball cards...shit, its 9$ for a beer...they only pay the guy serving it 7$ an hour!!! Fishing may have a more world wide approach than baseball and an argument could be made for commercial fishing and to be honest, I dont know the numbers worldwide, but I would be hard pressed to believe that a sport where the Yankees alone are worth over 1 Billion dollars ( http://www.forbes.com/lists/2006/33/334613.html ) could be outdone by fishing alone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,117 Posts
The following is a summation of the American Sportfishing Association’s newly-released report on the
economic impact of sportfishermen on our economy. The results are irrefutable; anglers are a big engine
in today’s economy.
In A Nutshell: Anglers’ Expenditures Have A Significant Impact on the Nation’s Economy
Recreational fishing is more than just a getaway for millions of Americans. As an industry, it provides a
living for countless people in businesses ranging from fishing tackle and accessories manufacturing to
travel and hospitality to boat manufacturing. According to a new report on fishing statistics, published by
the American Sportfishing Association (ASA), when expenditures are multiplied by America’s nearly 40
million anglers, their dollars have a significant impact on our nation’s economy.
Sportfishing in America: An Economic Engine and Conservation Powerhouse highlights how fishing not
only endures as an activity that permeates social and economic aspects of Americans’ lives, but also
plays a huge role in the country’s successful conservation movement.
“As an industry, we are keenly aware of the impact that sportfishing has on this nation’s economy,” said
ASA President and CEO Mike Nussman. “Just by enjoying a day on the water, men, women and children
across the United States pump billions of dollars into this country’s economy.” Nussman further said, “And
it’s not just the economy; America’s anglers are in many ways the nation’s most powerful force for the
environment investing hundreds of millions of dollars each year in fisheries management and
conservation through taxes on fishing equipment and license sales.”
America’s nearly 40 million anglers spend over $45 billion per year on fishing equipment, transportation,
lodging and other expenses associated with their sport. With a total annual economic impact of $125
billion, fishing supports over one million jobs and generates $34 billion in wages and $16 billion in tax
revenues each year. The average amount anglers spend yearly on hooks, rods, lures and other fishing
tackle increased 16 percent from 2001 to 2006.
A number of reports strongly indicate that fishing is identified by American families as one of the best
ways to spend quality time together. According to the National Sporting Goods Association, fishing as a
leisure-time activity ranks higher than playing basketball or softball, skateboarding, jogging or hiking.
Substantially more than any other groups, anglers support the nation’s conservation efforts through the
Sport Fish Restoration Program. Special taxes on fishing gear and motorboat fuel channel hundreds of
millions of anglers’ dollars to state fish and wildlife conservation and recreation programs each year.
The American Sportfishing Association’s analysis is based on data from the 2006 National Survey of
Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, conducted every five years on behalf of the
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies by the Census Bureau and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Sportfishing in America was produced for ASA by Southwick Associates, Fernandina Beach, Fla.
Additional economic facts about sportfishing:
· The nearly one million jobs supported by anglers are almost three times the number of people who work
for United Parcel Service in the U.S.
· The amount of federal tax revenues generated by angler spending in 2006 - $8.9 billion - is roughly
equal to the entire 2006 budget for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
· In 2006, the top 10 states with residents who fished, based on the percentage of population, are: Alaska,
Wyoming, Montana, Minnesota, Maine, Wisconsin, Idaho, Arkansas, West Virginia and Mississippi.
· In 2006, the top 10 states that attract the highest number of non-resident anglers are: Florida, North
Carolina, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, South Carolina, Maryland, Arkansas, New York and Texas.
· In 2006, the total days of fishing in the U.S. equaled 1,289,300 years of fishing.
· The not-so-lowly catfish is pursued by nearly seven million anglers, more than the population of Arizona,
Massachusetts or Washington.
· All the dollars spent by anglers, attached end to end, would reach to the moon and back – nine times!
The American Sportfishing Association (ASA) is the sportfishing industry’s trade association, committed to
looking out for the interests of the entire sportfishing community. We give the industry a unified voice,
speaking out on behalf of sportfishing and boating industries, state and federal natural resource agencies,
conservation organizations, angler advocacy groups and outdoor journalists when emerging laws and
policies could significantly affect sportfishing business or sportfishing itself. We invest in long-term
ventures to ensure the industry will remain strong and prosperous as well as safeguard and promote the
enduring social, economic and conservation values of sportfishing in America.
According to these numbers, every fisherman spends $3,125 every year on fishing, and spends over 35 - 8 hour days fishing every year. I'd like to know how they came up with those numbers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
lol

hands down baseball
they dont make fishing cards which are worth thousands and thats just the start, let alone hotdog sales.
dont get me started !!!!!!!!!!!!!
personally i think thats a stupid ass question!!!!!!!!!!!
but thats my option!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Baseball

I do both and I would have to say baseball hands down. I coach a traveling club team and it alone costs up to $15,000+- per team for the year to play. We are talking 13 year olds! Just think about how many of these type organizations there are around the WORLD at all ages!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
I coach a traveling club team and it alone costs up to $15,000+- per team for the year to play. We are talking 13 year olds!
I'm not one for government intervention but that's a crime. Absolutely nothing personal but nobody should have to pony up roughly $1k/kid to play a season of baseball, especially at age 13.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Crime?

You are entitled to your opinion and I can respect that....
If you have a child that excells at something, you (at least I do) try to do whatever you can to take them to the next level. Clubs teams do precisely that. This is not Little League! You get professional coaching and hopefully opportunities going into High School and College that most don't get. Recruiters actually seek players from this type of organization. So with that being said, how far do you want your child to go and how much are you willing to put into it?

Thanks for your opinion!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I may have stated the ? wrong txrngr got it right when he said total monies spent on a sport
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,195 Posts
I believe fishing might be the sport most participated in. although some might not do it as a sport. Wallmart keeps a lot more fishing poles than baseball bats or gloves in stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,657 Posts
I think we might be getting off base here (pun). Total economic impact of fishing vs. Baseball. I think if all things considered (and that is the tough part about economics) Fishing may just beat out any pro sport. " every fisherman spends $3,125 every year on fishing", maybe, I know I spend at lest that much a year on it.... Consider the average cost of a Bass Boat/Bay Boat/Off-shore Boat, The trucks to pull them, Fuel to tow and power them, repairs & service, electronics, rods, reels, line, lures, hooks, bait, guides, lodges, airfare, insurance, ect....... and really that only accounts for fishing from a boat, inculde kids on a creek or flyfishing, catfishing or any other variation you might think of.
Then consider the industries: Cabelas, BPS, Sportsmans, every local shop; how many people are employed by "Fishing"? Taxes & Licensing Fees. There's only what?, 30 MLB teams? There are 3-4 minor league and farms teams under each one, It doesn't really matter what a major league player makes when there are thousands,and maybe more, of fishermen for every ball player. If the argument is limited to fishing in general vs. Pro Baseball, I think total economic impact of fishing might not just edge out Pro Baseball, it might well blow it out of the water.

One thing we all make a mistake of doing in any argument is discount everything we don't know about what we are talking about. We narrow the scope of the argument down enough to make the answer easy, and it is never narrow or easy. take health care reform....................
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top