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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was browsing through the Tournament section and have some questions.

How many usually to a boat in a tournament? I saw some post about 'I would rather net' is it etiquette that you net for the boat owner/driver? What other etiquette is there for fishing on someone else s boat. I own a wakeboard boat so I know about helping out at the dock, splitting for gas, helping clean the boat when your done. I am talking about etiquette that may be unique to fishing and or tournaments.

Also what is a good tourny to get your feet wet?

Thanks in advance
 

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Fishing etiquette? You are going to get a lot of different answers on this one.

IMO!
1. Netting fish. Whom ever does not have a fish on, gets the net.
2. Splitting gas. Some on here won't take gas money, but it should always be offered.
3. Cleaning the boat. I see a lot of guys at tourneys, cleaning their boat, if you are with them, offer to lend a hand.
4. Fishing. Some guys will let you get up front, some will "back seat" the whole day, it all depends. The whole time I have fished with my dad, I have been back seat, but he always lets me have water to fish, I just got used to it, and I do pretty good out of the back seat.

5. Tourney to get your feet wet with. I would suggest Jack AZ, low entry, good payout, low key, and fun.
 

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The Lite's list is pretty good but I'd like to elaborate on it a little.

There are a few different formats for tournaments. The more common are Team, Draw, and Pro/Am.

Team tourney is self explanatory.....the two of you will help each other catch and land fish. When team fishing, you'll probably share the deck when it makes sense.

In a draw toruney, you'll be randomly paired with a boater and generally will be fishing for your own fish and boater the same. While this is a great opportunity to learn a lot, don't expect a guide trip. Some will make it difficult for you to cast into the prime areas and some will spill their guts and give you every opportunity. These are generally low cost, entry level tourneys and most commonly put on by bass clubs although you will find them in higher level venues.

Pro/Am is another form of draw but you fish as a team. Your "Pro" (who may or may not be a true pro) will likely coach you because not only is it more fun to fish this way, it's in his/her best interest. Your percieved and demonstrated abilities will likely dictate what he/she may suggest you do.

I don't know what level you're at, but my suggestion for learning the most the quickest is to fish a Pro/Am format. MBC has one, WON Bass has one, the BASS Federation Nation has one and probably some clubs too.

Good Luck
BT
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Fishing etiquette? You are going to get a lot of different answers on this one.

IMO!
1. Netting fish. Whom ever does not have a fish on, gets the net.
2. Splitting gas. Some on here won't take gas money, but it should always be offered.
3. Cleaning the boat. I see a lot of guys at tourneys, cleaning their boat, if you are with them, offer to lend a hand.
4. Fishing. Some guys will let you get up front, some will "back seat" the whole day, it all depends. The whole time I have fished with my dad, I have been back seat, but he always lets me have water to fish, I just got used to it, and I do pretty good out of the back seat.

5. Tourney to get your feet wet with. I would suggest Jack AZ, low entry, good payout, low key, and fun.
Thanks The Lite (love your sigline lol) So 2 & 4 make total sense being I am a boat owner and have taken many people out, so I get that part.

#1 and #4 make sense, thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The Lite's list is pretty good but I'd like to elaborate on it a little.

There are a few different formats for tournaments. The more common are Team, Draw, and Pro/Am.

Team tourney is self explanatory.....the two of you will help each other catch and land fish. When team fishing, you'll probably share the deck when it makes sense.

In a draw toruney, you'll be randomly paired with a boater and generally will be fishing for your own fish and boater the same. While this is a great opportunity to learn a lot, don't expect a guide trip. Some will make it difficult for you to cast into the prime areas and some will spill their guts and give you every opportunity. These are generally low cost, entry level tourneys and most commonly put on by bass clubs although you will find them in higher level venues.

Pro/Am is another form of draw but you fish as a team. Your "Pro" (who may or may not be a true pro) will likely coach you because not only is it more fun to fish this way, it's in his/her best interest. Your percieved and demonstrated abilities will likely dictate what he/she may suggest you do.

I don't know what level you're at, but my suggestion for learning the most the quickest is to fish a Pro/Am format. MBC has one, WON Bass has one, the BASS Federation Nation has one and probably some clubs too.

Good Luck
BT
Thanks BassTrix, I am in Ahwatukee it says so in my profile..lol. I know what you mean, I am just getting into fishing so thanks for your input. I will check out some of those ProAm's and the Jack AZ as The Lite suggested.
 

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Fish a Road Trip! They are highly recommended by top fisherman and guide, Chris Love. :Iconrotfl
 

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Maybe limit yourself to 4 or 5 rods or so instead of the entire arsenal, one or two tackle bags and basically just act the way you'd want someone to be in your boat.
Sounds like you already have boating skills so the obvious things like launching/retrieving with the truck are a given.
I would also say its a good idea to discuss up front how any side pots are handled too - if your both in a big fish side pot, is it split between you if one gets the fish or not etc.
 

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Hey that was a great question! I'm just getting started too, and am very interested in working my up through the tourney ranks. Hopefully, the guys on here will help us avoid a few dumbass mistakes.
 

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Wear soft soled shoes to avoid damage to upholstery, carpet or boat finish. Wet decks get slick too.
That's a good one, you forgot to add wraps for crank baits so they don't punch holes in the upholstery.
 

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The 1 thing that bothers me the most as a boater is when the nonboater steps on the seat to get to the back deck. I always ask whoever fishes with me to not step on the seats, 1st thing in the am. Usually that takes care of it, but sometimes not. I had a 2000 ranger that I sold. I had to get the seats redone to be able to sell it. The only seat with rips was the passenger seat. Most boats have a step between the 2 seats to get to the back deck, USE it. If it doesn't have a step most of us are able to step over the seats to get to the back. Just a little common sense.
 

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I try not to step on the seats, but it gets tough. When I do, I use my whole foot, flat on the flat part of the seat, so I don't rip or tear anything. I saw that the new Nitros have foot steps between the seats. Cool stuff.

I am a back seater. I pay for gas and drinks. I treat my partner's boat as if it was mine. At the end of the day, I wipe down the boat and get it ready to travel. I only take one bag for tackle, and I usually only take four poles, as that is a good number to carry and to use. If your partner offers you a rod locker, then use it.

Just be courtious as you would want someone else to be. Also, you have a right to fish out of the boat also, and does not mean you have to be abused and other crap. If you find yourself pointed to the middle of the lake, move to the front. You don't have to put up with crap. You have a right to fish too.
 

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The 1 thing that bothers me the most as a boater is when the nonboater steps on the seat to get to the back deck. I always ask whoever fishes with me to not step on the seats, 1st thing in the am. Usually that takes care of it, but sometimes not. I had a 2000 ranger that I sold. I had to get the seats redone to be able to sell it. The only seat with rips was the passenger seat. Most boats have a step between the 2 seats to get to the back deck, USE it. If it doesn't have a step most of us are able to step over the seats to get to the back. Just a little common sense.
+1 on that... If you cant get to the back deck without stepping on the seats, take off your shoes! Thats what i do
 

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Standing on the seat cushions is one of my peeves also. Another is not keeping gear organized and in assigned locations. The worst mistake a backseater can make is pulling out a meatball sub or grinder dripping sauce or oil & vinegar! Oh yeah, if you take a leak off the stern, throw some water on the transom when done......

OTF:)
 

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Reading some of these reminded me of a nickname we had for a certain annoying behavior of a few back-seaters......the term is "nester".....because some folks will sit on the back deck, dig out pretty much all of their tackle and build a nest out of it with them in the center. The annoying part is when you let them know you'd like to make a move in a few mins....and after a few mins you're ready to go but nester hasn't even begun to put back his/her tackle.

Moral of the story....if the boater say's we're moving in a few, be ready when he/she is.
 

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I look at the non-boat now as a team member and it does not matter if we are fun fishing or fishing a tournament. Unless you are hiring a guide don't just climb on the boat and plant your ass in that seat and expect to do nothing but fish. Offer assistance, from backing up the boat to wiping it down and offering some money for gas.

It's a good idea that the non-boater knows how to back up a trailer, this include launching and recovering a boat. If you do not know how to do this do not hide the fact. On the ramp this is not the place to practice and learn unless you are at the lake on a Holiday weekend with the rest of the ramp circus.

Most guys pre-flight their boats before launching. Get involved, know how to undue tie-down straps and the engine transome support. Make sure the main drain plugs are in. Look over the boat controls such as livewell fill, light switches, again get a understanding of the boat and controls. Have you ever driven a boat with a Hot Foot or worked a trolling motor?

When you get to the fishing know how the boater wants the net handled. Some guys like to tell you when to put the net into the water and he then has control and puts the fish in it. To me this is the only way to do it, JMO. If the boater get his reel nested offer to take the trolling motor. When the boater says it is time to make a move, quickly reel in your bait and be ready to move. Organization is key here. Building your fishing empire on the back deck is a sure fire way to loose an opportunity. A bleeding fish can cause a big mess, as the boater what he thinks about this before you launch. Blood can be cleaned out of carpet but some people get excited if they get their boat messy with fish blood.

Other things to do. Go on the Lowrance website and get some insight to how sonar and GPS work. It's free. Buy a map of the lake and learn different area locations. Read a few book on Bass fishing and understand seasonal patterns. Offer to bring food, drinks and snacks.

Just for some information. Owning a boat can be expensive. Insurance alone on my boat is $45/month and that is month in month out no matter if I take my boat out or not I am paying this. Then outboard oil is $25 a gallon and normally someone burns up at least a 1/4 gallon. I am replacing my trolling motor batteries soon and that cost is over $400.00. Then you have yearly engine servicing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I look at the non-boat now as a team member and it does not matter if we are fun fishing or fishing a tournament. Unless you are hiring a guide don't just climb on the boat and plant your ass in that seat and expect to do nothing but fish. Offer assistance, from backing up the boat to wiping it down and offering some money for gas.

It's a good idea that the non-boater knows how to back up a trailer, this include launching and recovering a boat. If you do not know how to do this do not hide the fact. On the ramp this is not the place to practice and learn unless you are at the lake on a Holiday weekend with the rest of the ramp circus.

Most guys pre-flight their boats before launching. Get involved, know how to undue tie-down straps and the engine transome support. Make sure the main drain plugs are in. Look over the boat controls such as livewell fill, light switches, again get a understanding of the boat and controls. Have you ever driven a boat with a Hot Foot or worked a trolling motor?

When you get to the fishing know how the boater wants the net handled. Some guys like to tell you when to put the net into the water and he then has control and puts the fish in it. To me this is the only way to do it, JMO. If the boater get his reel nested offer to take the trolling motor. When the boater says it is time to make a move, quickly reel in your bait and be ready to move. Organization is key here. Building your fishing empire on the back deck is a sure fire way to loose an opportunity. A bleeding fish can cause a big mess, as the boater what he thinks about this before you launch. Blood can be cleaned out of carpet but some people get excited if they get their boat messy with fish blood.

Other things to do. Go on the Lowrance website and get some insight to how sonar and GPS work. It's free. Buy a map of the lake and learn different area locations. Read a few book on Bass fishing and understand seasonal patterns. Offer to bring food, drinks and snacks.

Just for some information. Owning a boat can be expensive. Insurance alone on my boat is $45/month and that is month in month out no matter if I take my boat out or not I am paying this. Then outboard oil is $25 a gallon and normally someone burns up at least a 1/4 gallon. I am replacing my trolling motor batteries soon and that cost is over $400.00. Then you have yearly engine servicing.
Thanks Obewan that is some great info. Being a boat owner I have most of the stuff covered, I am a fanatic about my boat. In fact when ever we go out the plug is put in before we even leave the drive way (my wife and I were on a boat that someone forgot and it has REALLY stuck with her lol)

But I have never run a trolling motor, I have friend that has a two person boat with a trolling motor...I think I will ask him to borrow it and get the feel of it.

I have bought a couple books on bass fishing and have gained a lot of info (at least to help me)

Question, are outboards 2 strokes? I have never had to deal with oil on my boat (besides changing it twice a season for good measure).
 

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You being a boat owner I was sure you had experienced a lot of what I said. I just wanted so share some general info for people looking at ways they can help or the one that need a walk up call....LOL

Almost all outboards on bass boats are 2 stroke, a few guys have 4 stroke engines but most of the 2 strokes are actually as clean if not cleaner burning then a 4 stroke. To get the power band that bass boats need the 4 stroke is running either a turbo or supercharger under the cowling. The 4's are slightly bigger and heavier then 2's, but all the OEM are working on that.

With the people running 2's most have injection and adding oil is done just like on a car through a fill port usually on the back of the boat or in the battery compartment.

YouTube is a great source of information on fishing. Type in a subject like Yamamoto, Jerkbait, casting reel, Lowrance and you can get a lot of good information. Here is a great site for picking up info too.

http://www.bassfishin.com/
 
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