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those are on aluminum boats, are we safer in a fiberglass boat? (serious question)
 

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I would think you would be a little safer (how much???).

I wonder if the anchor to the bottom make a better ground.
 

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i was out there at plez saturday fishing after the dillions tourney. around 5-6pm the storms rolled in with thunder west of the lake. i guess there was enough static in the air since i got shocked. my partner even heard me getting stocked. when i got shocked, you can hear a few ticks. i never got off the lake so fast...

i always heard stories of line floating, static shock, etc... never believed them until it happened to me. scary stuff!
 

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i was out there at plez saturday fishing after the dillions tourney. around 5-6pm the storms rolled in with thunder west of the lake. i guess there was enough static in the air since i got shocked. my partner even heard me getting stocked. when i got shocked, you can hear a few ticks. i never got off the lake so fast...

i always heard stories of line floating, static shock, etc... never believed them until it happened to me. scary stuff!
that was god blessing your pole. Now its magic. Scary shit though
 

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ive been on the lake in my 1st boat it was a tin boat and the entire thing was humming and every time i raised my rod the humming got louder i got the hell outa there!
 

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http://www.nasdonline.org/document/209/d000007/boating-lightning-protection.html

There is no such thing as lightning-proof boats, only lightning-protected boats. All-metal ships are rarely damaged, and injuries or deaths are uncommon. These ships are frequently struck, but the high conductivity of the large quantities of metal, with hundreds of square yards of hull in direct contact with the water, causes rapid dissipation of the electrical charge.


But small boats are seldom made of metal. Their wood and fiberglass construction do not provide the automatic grounding protection offered by metal-hulled craft. Therefore, when lightning strikes a small boat, the electrical current is searching any route to ground and the human body is an excellent conductor of electricity!

Today's fiberglass-constructed small boats, especially sailboats, are particularly vulnerable to lightning strikes since any projection above the flat surface of the water acts as a potential lightning rod. In many cases, the small boat operator or casual weekend sailor is not aware of this vulnerability to the hazards of lightning. These boats can be protected from lightning strikes by properly designed and connected systems of lightning protection. However, the majority of these boats are not so equipped.

Lightning protection systems do not prevent lightning strikes. They may, in fact, increase the possibilities of the boat being struck. The purpose of lightning protection is to reduce the damage to the boat and the possibility of injuries or death to the passengers from a lightning strike.

When the lightning does strike, it will most often strike the highest object in the immediate area. On a body of water, that highest object is a boat. Once it strikes the boat, the electrical charge is going to take the most direct route to the water where the electrical charge will dissipate in all directions.

Negative charges repel negative charges and attract positive charges. So, as a thunder cloud passes overhead, a concentration of positive charges accumulates in and on all objects below the cloud. Since these positive charges are attempting to reach the negative charge of the cloud, they tend to accumulate at the top of the highest object around. On a boat that may be the radio antenna, the mast, a fishing rod, or even you! The better the contact an object has with the water, the more easily these positive charges can enter the object and race upward toward the negative charge in the bottom of the cloud.

Let's consider a few possibilities. Lightning strikes the ungrounded radio antenna on your boat. The metal antenna carries the electrical charge to the radio, which does not have a good conductor to the water. Your hand is on the radio, or on metal connected to the radio. Your feet are on a wet surface, which is in contact with metal which extends through the hull of the boat to the water. Your body may then become the best conductor for the electrical charge.

A second example is a sailboat. Lightning strikes the mast. The electrical current follows the mast or wire rope to your hands, through your body to the wet surface, and then through the hull to the water.
Or, while operating a motor boat, the lightning strikes you, passes through your body to the motor, and then to the water.

Or, sitting in your aluminum or fiberglass rowboat, you are holding a graphite (a good electrical conductor) fishing rod. The rod is struck by lightning. The electrical charge passes through the rod, your body, then to the boat to the water.
 

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I used to fish and golf no matter what the weather was, but that was when I was young and invincable. Stories like that one over the years have made me wiser over the years. About an average of 58 to 100 (depending on what web link you find) people a year in the US are killed by lightning and about 2/5th's are killed on or near the water.

We had a young boy killed up here by lightning from a storm many miles away. The mother and a second son who were injured never even new the storm was close.

I just don't take a chance anymore.
 

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How the second person survived is beyond belief. Not only was the initial lighting strike a major player but also consider the gas tank burn made a large contribution to the secondary effects. Then more than likely there was a battery too that added to the mixture. Anyway you look at this the second person is lucky, that is if he did not suffer any problems after being released from the hospital he is one very lucky person.
 

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I was wondering if the guy that got it, was the same one pulling the anchor...

Wet rope and a backwards kite (big ground wire)???
 
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