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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since we have some windy/stormy days,so questions are in order for me!! If caught out far from ramp in a bad wind storm and you have to go back,should you hit the waves straight on and fast?Or what is the best option?Also,how about dropping an anchor and waiting it out?Some of you say to go into a sheltered cove and wait.What do you all do in bad weather?As far as getting the boat back on a trailer,I know that can be hard,but pulling up to shore can beat the boat to death.Any help??Thanks in advance!
 

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Stay calm and use common sense. No fish is worth your life. If it's that bad get in a cove and ride it out. We live in Arizona and it will pass, usually pretty quick. Keep the bow up and make sure you don't run so slow that you come off plane. If their rollers than you need to roll with them and sometime zig zag across the lake. Common sense and you'll be ok.
 

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Relax like RV traders says and if they are big roll with them and being in AZ watch for islands. They hide very well in a stromy situation, especially those little pimples that are just coming to a head, they will eat you up and leave you powerless against the storm.

Kill Switch and Jackets. Do any of you guys put your cell phone in a water tight compartment. Cigarette smokers invented a waterproof holder that works well with most phones FYI.
 

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WAIT IT OUT IN A COVE. NEVER RISK TRYING TO TRAILER A BOAT IN ROUGH WATER. WAIT IT OUT!!!! I PROMISE YOU THAT TRYING TO TRAILER YOUR BOAT IN BIG SWELLS WILL DO FAR MORE DAMAGE TO YOUR BOAT (OR YOU) IF YOU GET IT WRONG. JUST ASK AZROCKMAN, HE CAN TELL YOU FROM EXPERIENCE. SEEING HIS TRITON WASHED UP ON THE TEN LANE RAMP AT PLEZ A FEW MONTHS AGO, DURING A BAD STORM WITH HIS LOWER UNIT WEDGED UNDER THE WALKWAY AND TAKING A FULL ON BEATING MADE ME REALIZE THAT YOU DON'T MESS WITH MOTHER NATURE---YOU WILL LOOSE EVERYTIME REGARDLESS OF HOW MUCH EXPERIENCE YOU HAVE.
 

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don't try to trailer your boat! wait it out. if you're throwing an anchor, don't throw it straight down. don't hit the wave hard and fast. slow and steady is key. hiding out in a cove would be my choice.

every boat is different. i have a hot foot on mine. i like to trim up (going slow and steady) so when i step on it, it lifts the front of the boat. when going down a roller, i step on it just a bit to keep the nose from diving into the next roller.

i've done this on 5 ft rollers at plez and didn't even get wet. maybe it's because i have a 21.5 ft boat, maybe it's me, but that works for me.

i know my boat very well and know that it can do. like i said, every boat is different.
 

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Kill Switch and Jackets. Do any of you guys put your cell phone in a water tight compartment. Cigarette smokers invented a waterproof holder that works well with most phones FYI.
I've been putting my billfold, keys and phone in an empty peanutbutter jar, it seems to be water tight
 

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hit the waves straight on,bow up and fast enough to stay on plane, no don't anchor to easy to get swamped and sink boat. trailering don't back in so far that way you don't risk having the boat overshoot the bow tie down load short and wench on trailer. but your best case stenario is to keep your eyes on the sky and heed the warnings, no fish is worth damaging your boat or possibly getting hurt or lose your life/ don't want to be another statistic on the news, [jmht]
 

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hit the waves straight on,bow up and fast enough to stay on plane, no don't anchor to easy to get swamped and sink boat. trailering don't back in so far that way you don't risk having the boat overshoot the bow tie down load short and wench on trailer. but your best case stenario is to keep your eyes on the sky and heed the warnings, no fish is worth damaging your boat or possibly getting hurt or lose your life/ don't want to be another statistic on the news, [jmht]
Your kidding right? How long have you been boating? You have given the worst advice in just about every statement you made and following this advice will do nothing but get you in a lot of trouble quickly.

You don’t get on plane and attack large waves; this is the absolute worst advice I have ever heard! Dude, you are not in a Whaler… Hit the waves well below plane speed, the slower the better and depending on the size of the wave you can trim to either cut into it, or keep the bow up as to keep from swamping…

You don’t hit the waves head on, but instead pay very close attention and quarter into them…

Anchoring in rough water is a legitimate way to wait out a storm. 1st of all the theory is, unless you are on the great lakes, or you are paying attention, you CAN find a protected shore, or cove (even if minimally)and anchor, or in deep water use a drift sock as to keep you pointed in the wind as the worst thing you can do is lose power. You want that bow pointed into the wave so that the keel can do its work and float you over the wave. You NEVER want to anchor out of the transom as you will be swamped. Using proper anchoring techniques will work; you will not swamp the boat. Having the wave hit you at its speed and letting the boats design ride you through it is far better than navigating through it via motor…

As far as loading, loading short may be your best advice; but again, there is no reason you need to do this; it is better to sit in the storm than load your boat. Ultimatly you will still need to get that boat in the water to tighten it up. All it takes is one wave; the loss of power, mistake, you being pushed off your trailer just a minimal amount to start pounding that boat on the launch, with possibly you or someone else in it…

The only good advice you gave was to keep your eyes on the sky and heed the warnings. You need to pay attention to the weather…

Sorry if this appears to be an attack, this is just horrid advice and nowhere will you read or learn these tactics… Take a boating class… Delete this post; absolute worst advice I have seen; it has to be a joke…
 

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on big waves and one spread out real far you ride them like a surf board at about a 30º - 45º just before you get to the bottom you hit the throttle to make the nose go up.
Del is in the perfect storm; crap, hope I never see waves that big... LOL.

every lake every wave is different so every situation is different.
Again, great advice and true!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Your kidding right? How long have you been boating? You have given the worst advice in just about every statement you made and following this advice will do nothing but get you in a lot of trouble quickly.

You don’t get on plane and attack large waves; this is the absolute worst advice I have ever heard! Dude, you are not in a Whaler… Hit the waves well below plane speed, the slower the better and depending on the size of the wave you can trim to either cut into it, or keep the bow up as to keep from swamping…

You don’t hit the waves head on, but instead pay very close attention and quarter into them…

Anchoring in rough water is a legitimate way to wait out a storm. 1st of all the theory is, unless you are on the great lakes, or you are paying attention, you CAN find a protected shore, or cove (even if minimally)and anchor, or in deep water use a drift sock as to keep you pointed in the wind as the worst thing you can do is lose power. You want that bow pointed into the wave so that the keel can do its work and float you over the wave. You NEVER want to anchor out of the transom as you will be swamped. Using proper anchoring techniques will work; you will not swamp the boat. Having the wave hit you at its speed and letting the boats design ride you through it is far better than navigating through it via motor…

As far as loading, loading short may be your best advice; but again, there is no reason you need to do this; it is better to sit in the storm than load your boat. Ultimatly you will still need to get that boat in the water to tighten it up. All it takes is one wave; the loss of power, mistake, you being pushed off your trailer just a minimal amount to start pounding that boat on the launch, with possibly you or someone else in it…

The only good advice you gave was to keep your eyes on the sky and heed the warnings. You need to pay attention to the weather…

Sorry if this appears to be an attack, this is just horrid advice and nowhere will you read or learn these tactics… Take a boating class… Delete this post; absolute worst advice I have seen; it has to be a joke…
Thanks alot!Maybe that guy dont like me!!!!lol Some good advice guys thanks!The rollers scare me,and Im almost always off the water before the big storm hits,but Ive been getting braver latley and just wanted some good advice!So hit the waves at an angle if you have to go thru them and slower is better????Thanks again for the good responses!!!
 

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hit the waves straight on,bow up and fast enough to stay on plane, no don't anchor to easy to get swamped and sink boat. trailering don't back in so far that way you don't risk having the boat overshoot the bow tie down load short and wench on trailer. but your best case stenario is to keep your eyes on the sky and heed the warnings, no fish is worth damaging your boat or possibly getting hurt or lose your life/ don't want to be another statistic on the news, [jmht]
Your kidding right? How long have you been boating? You have given the worst advice in just about every statement you made and following this advice will do nothing but get you in a lot of trouble quickly.

You don’t get on plane and attack large waves; this is the absolute worst advice I have ever heard! Dude, you are not in a Whaler… Hit the waves well below plane speed, the slower the better and depending on the size of the wave you can trim to either cut into it, or keep the bow up as to keep from swamping…

You don’t hit the waves head on, but instead pay very close attention and quarter into them…

Anchoring in rough water is a legitimate way to wait out a storm. 1st of all the theory is, unless you are on the great lakes, or you are paying attention, you CAN find a protected shore, or cove (even if minimally)and anchor, or in deep water use a drift sock as to keep you pointed in the wind as the worst thing you can do is lose power. You want that bow pointed into the wave so that the keel can do its work and float you over the wave. You NEVER want to anchor out of the transom as you will be swamped. Using proper anchoring techniques will work; you will not swamp the boat. Having the wave hit you at its speed and letting the boats design ride you through it is far better than navigating through it via motor…

As far as loading, loading short may be your best advice; but again, there is no reason you need to do this; it is better to sit in the storm than load your boat. Ultimatly you will still need to get that boat in the water to tighten it up. All it takes is one wave; the loss of power, mistake, you being pushed off your trailer just a minimal amount to start pounding that boat on the launch, with possibly you or someone else in it…

The only good advice you gave was to keep your eyes on the sky and heed the warnings. You need to pay attention to the weather…

Sorry if this appears to be an attack, this is just horrid advice and nowhere will you read or learn these tactics… Take a boating class… Delete this post; absolute worst advice I have seen; it has to be a joke…
360 is right on the money YOU DONT ANCHOR a bass boat they dont set high enough in the water to weather a storm with 2-3 footers let alone 5 footers.

and a 20+ foot boat will ride on top of the waves with NO problem if the spacing is correct been there done that.

the problem is most people tend to exagerate the waves by mistake as they have nothign to judge the height with. put it this way if your standing on the bow and all you see is water at eye level then your in 5-7 foot waves. most so called 5 foot waves are more than likely 2-3 footers which are still very big.

Rollers ( non white caps) are almost impossible to ride on top of cause they are spread out way to far, white caps you can ride on the top as they arent spread out that far.


Del is in the perfect storm; crap, hope I never see waves that big... LOL.
Ive seen them been in them and sunk a boat in them ;)



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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks del !!
 

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BPRescue, You DO take large waves head on at an appropriate speed that will insure you get to the top before it crests and breaks over you. If you quarter you WILL be rolled!

OTF:)
 

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Del's point about every situation being unique is right on. There is not one single answer to this. Besides the lake and waves a lot depends on the length, hull of the boat. Bass boats are built for speed and in rough water the experience of the driver really comes into play, there is no simulator for this and what happens all depends on the driver. You can be close to shore and the waves look like you can navigate them ok, get out in the middle of the lake and all bets are off. Find the best shelter you can and point the bow into the waves if you are still in a bad area, never have the stern taking the waves. This is the fastest way for a boat to overtaken and sink. Or when beached fill up with water from the boat angle on the shore and waves coming over the stern. If your batteries become usless your bilge is also no longer functioning.

If I have no other choice but to cross a lake in bad conditions I keep the nose up just high enough to cut through a wave and the speed what I find to myself that is reasonable for those conditions. Hang on cause you are going to get wet. I also put on a traditional life jacket, don't want one of the auto inflating one to blow open crashing a wave.

Best bet is to take a boating class.
 

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I think we are getting a little off task here. Maybe I am assuming , but I thought we were discussing a bass boat type scenario on Arizona lakes such as Rosey, etc.
That said, having enough power to crest; hitting head on otherwise the boat will capsize, etc, does not apply here. You are not going to roll over in our roughest waves when in the middle of the lake and either quartering into them, or taking it at 45 degrees the opposite direction. You have an 8’ beam and unless you are in a canoe, or very small aluminum, this is the best way of attack as to keep from swamping the boat. I see your point, but it truly is not applicable for our waters; you are talking about offshore (which I have done as well)and 7-10’ or greater swells which you just do not address in a bass boat. Rosey gets big waves, but not as big as you cite where you have to hit head on and worry about how to address the throttle for crest and trough. Powell, especially the main channel can be of different tactics.

As far as anchoring, this is still legitimate; again you find a protected area (all lakes have them) and wait out the store. Absolutely the best scenario if you are trapped on the lake.

I see both of your points, but as Dell said, this all comes back to conditions, type of boat, lake, etc. Again, we need to stay focused to the particular posting; which in all of our haste we neglected to ask just what kind of boat we are talking about and which lakes… As I alluded too though, I have done both inland waters and offshore for most of my life; I understand there are variables and no one answer solves the issue. And yes, there is a difference between hull design, and you must know your boats limitations, but many rules are the same…

Just for giggles, I did a quick google and found a couple articles as they pertain to bass boats…

http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/s...mode=article&objectID=29986&catID=&subcatID=0

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/print?id=3068952&type=story

For big water this also talks of anchoring…

http://www.greatlakesbass.com/fishing/bigwaterboating.htm

I think the best move for all is to take a boating safety course.
 

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on big waves and one spread out real far you ride them like a surf board at about a 30º - 45º just before you get to the bottom you hit the throttle to make the nose go up.

every lake every wave is different so every situation is different.
+1

This is how you do it on Mead when they get real big!
 
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